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School of Human Sciences

Introduction to the School of Human Sciences

Founded in 2010, the School of Human Sciences consists of a Department of Psychology, which focuses on research into the human mind, and a Department of Sociology, which conducts research into communal life and the environment in which it occurs. Although the School is new, it has nearly 50 years of history as the Department of Psychology and Department of Sociology trace their roots back to the Psychology (Experimental Psychology) Course and the Social Culture Course offered by the Department of Humanities in the School of Letters, which was established in 1966. Both departments emphasize experiments and practical learning, and offer students educational and research facilities on a par with their counterparts at the country’s leading institutions, including a dedicated computer lab, laboratories, and practical training rooms. In this environment, students undertake a comprehensive study of the field in order to explicate the mechanisms (causal relationships) underlying various phenomena that occur in the human mind and society, and to understand human beings in a scientific, empirical sense. To achieve this, the Department cultivates students’ ability to autonomously participate in activities that support society, together with an advanced level of specialized knowledge.

Empirically studying phenomena that cannot be seen

The School of Human Sciences considers empirical research to be the most important factor in deepening our understanding of humankind. Empirical proof consists of explaining phenomena based on objective evidence that anybody could see and experience. The School values this way of looking at science, which it uses to explore how the human mind functions and how people live in society, by leveraging a range of empirical techniques.

Emphasizing small class sizes

The School has developed a program of study that facilitates careful instruction in the context of a rigorous commitment to small class sizes so that students can best master empirical techniques. Typical of this approach are its seminars. All students participate in seminars of 5 to 10 students during their first year. Through these classes, which expose them to instruction from their assigned professor while providing opportunities to deepen understanding in their field of specialization with a focus on class discussions and research presentations, students are able to develop a comprehensive and multifaceted understanding of what it means to be human.

Department of Psychology

Introduction to the Department of Psychology

Studying basic psychology and clinical psychology in a well-balanced manner

ind_p_01.jpgThe Department of Psychology is dedicated to training graduates who will be able to give something back to society as practitioners or researchers in the field, with the overall goal of realizing the comparative, analytical, and autonomous understanding of human behavior offered by contemporary psychology through the practical study of knowledge, theory, and research methods (skills) in the various domains of psychology.

Broadly speaking, psychology can be divided into two fields: basic psychology, which seeks to ascertain the precise nature of the mechanisms of the human mind through experimentation and observation; and clinical psychology, which centers on the practice of counseling and other techniques. The Department of Psychology offers instruction by an outstanding faculty and an extensive range of dedicated laboratories, practical training rooms, and other facilities, so that students can learn about the subject’s broad domain in a way that balances these two fields.

In this outstanding environment, students can expect to have their interests stimulated, and to encounter research projects that lend themselves to thoughtful and deliberate pursuit. For example, some research seeks to determine what causes trends or why people can sympathize with other people. Students process data from experiments and surveys to explore the questions that arise in daily life, and summarize what they learn in reports and theses. Through this process, they develop a deeper understanding of the human mind while cultivating skills that will be useful in forging better human relationships in society.

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Department of Sociology

Introduction to the Department of Sociology

Going out into the field and looking for solutions to social problems

ind_p_02.jpgThe Department of Sociology takes human lifestyles as the principal subject of its research and academic inquiry. It is dedicated to training students to make accurate judgments about social circumstances, to take action in a steady and deliberate manner, and to contribute to the development of scholarship with the overall goal of elucidating the true nature of human behavior and awareness, social relationships, organizations, and other aspects of human social existence, as well as the structure of contemporary society and the problems that have come to characterize it.

Students conduct interviews in the field about inquiries they have designed, discuss data from those interviews with one another, and derive unique solutions. Through their fieldwork, they learn that society is not homogenous, and they develop an awareness of themselves as members of a diverse society. The number of specialized courses and full-time faculty make the Department of Sociology prominent among Japanese universities that have a department of sociology.

The Department offers three programs drawn from its broad range of specialized courses based on students’ likely future paths. Since the programs are loosely interconnected, students are able to deepen their research by broadening their perspective and interests to include other programs, and to bring what they have learned back to their own area of specialization.

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Diploma Policy: Awarding of degrees and certification of graduation

School of Human Sciences
The School of Human Sciences awards a Bachelor’s Degree in Psychology to a student of its Department of Psychology and the same in Sociology to a student of its Department of Sociology who, through learning at the respective Departments and earning the number of credits required as a graduation qualification under the Department rules, has attained a wide scope of general knowledge as well as advanced knowledge and skills in his or her chosen academic discipline, and is capable of understanding human beings in a scientific and empirical manner based on practical research and observation, acquiring the regions of knowledge required to analyze the cause-and effect mechanisms of various events and phenomena related to human mind and society, and is willing to contribute to the human society in good faith and proactive manner.

Department of Psychology
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has acquired the knowledge and theories that have been accumulated in various fields of psychological study. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Has acquired various empirical skills, including the use of available research equipment, that can be used for understanding human activities. (Skills and power of expression)
  4. Is capable of effectively using his or her knowledge and skills based on critical, analytical and proactive understanding of human activities that is essential to modern psychology. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  5. Is capable of voluntarily finding an unsolved issue and solving such issue in an appropriate manner. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of Sociology
  1. Has acquired the knowledge and theories that have been accumulated in various fields of sociological study and has an understanding that personal human issues are interrelated with social organizations and systems. (Knowledge and understanding)
  2. Has acquired various scientific and empirical study skills including those of social researches for the purpose of validly understanding social behaviors and organizations, and is capable of communicating his or her thought orally or in a written form in an easy-to-understand manner. (Skills and power of expression)
  3. Has an interest in the diversity of values and cultures in various societies and is capable of and willing to obtain a deeper, better understanding of others. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Is capable, by utilizing the above-described skills and capacities in a comprehensive manner, of validly contemplating and analyzing practical issues in society. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Curriculum Policy: Planning and implementation of courses and programs

School of Human Sciences
The School of Human Sciences, in order for its students to attain the qualities and capabilities that they are expected to fulfill as the requirement to graduate and/or receive degrees, systematically and effectively plans courses in the transitional, introductory, liberal arts and specialized curricula to be provided by its departments, in an optimum mix of classroom lectures and practical courses. The planning and implementation of educational courses and programs and the evaluation of students’ learning achievements will be done in the following manner:

Department of Psychology
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided in the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • The Department provides basic humanities, basic social science, natural science, “composite” (interdisciplinary) courses, foreign language and health and physical education courses as part of the liberal arts curriculum.
    • The specialized curriculum is progressively provided from the first year, starting from basic psychological knowledge and research technique learning courses. The courses include lectures, experimental and laboratory works and practices in a well-balanced manner so that students can learn psychological theories and research techniques in a systematic manner to be ready to work on the graduation thesis.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
    • The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help students deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world through appropriate language-based communications and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • Specialized courses including the compulsory “General Psychology A” and “B” as well as elective compulsory and elective courses are designed to assist students to first acquire basic knowledge that is required of anybody who wishes to take on the study of psychology to be ready to learn the vast knowledge and theories that have been historically accumulated in multiple regions of psychological studies.
      • For the understanding of human behaviors, small-group experimental and laboratory works are conducted in “Basic Experimentation in Psychology 1” and “2” in the first and second years to help the students acquire various empirical research techniques.
      • To get a picture of the critical, analytical and proactive human behavior understanding offered by contemporary psychology, “Readings in Psychology 1” and “2”, “Psychological Data Processing 1A”, “1B”, “2A” and “2B”, “Computer Applications in Psychology A” and “B” and “Practice of Clinical Psychology A” and “B” are provided to assist students to acquire relevant knowledge and skills in a self-motivated manner.
      • “Research Methods in Psychology 1” and “2” provided in the third and fourth years guide the students to find unsolved problems and solve them by the most appropriate means. All the students are required to participate in small-group seminar courses to understand the diversity of academic and field-derived knowledges involved in understanding the human mind. What they have learned through all these activities will be put into the graduation thesis work, through which they learn how their knowledge and skills can potentially contribute to the society.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 4 credits from the compulsory “General Psychology A” and “B” and 32 credit from elective compulsory courses and 20 credits from elective courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed an evidence that the student has acquired a general, systematic understanding of the fields of psychology.
    • Earning of 6 credits from the compulsory “Basic Experimentation in Psychology 1” and “2” in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has learned empirical psychology research techniques.
    • Earning of 8 units from “Research Methods in Psychology 1” and “2” courses and 8 more from the graduation thesis work will be deemed as an evidence that the student has attained capacities to find unsolved problems and solve them by the most appropriate means utilizing his or her accumulated knowledge and skills.
    • Evaluation of “Graduation Thesis” including oral reviews will be the basis of assessment about whether the student has attained all the qualities and capacities that are specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.
Department of Sociology
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including introductory seminar, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • The Department provides basic humanities, basic social science, natural science, “composite” (interdisciplinary) courses, foreign language and health and physical education courses as part of the liberal arts curriculum.
    • In the specialized curriculum, the specialized domain of sociology is divided into the three areas of “Culture and Systems”, “Regional and Areal Studies” and “Lifestyles and Social Welfare”. Specialized courses associated with each of these areas are arranged to provide a progressive and systematic learning experience with inter-course relationships and sequences taken into consideration.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • In order to advance to the specialized curriculum in the second and subsequent years by utilizing academic skills acquired in the Senshu University introductory courses, the “Senshu University Introductory Seminar” which will allow students to learn basic knowledge and thinking techniques associated with a selected field of sociology and pursue research is compulsory.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues. (Compulsory)
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • The specialized curriculum of the Department of Sociology is divided into the three areas of “Culture and Systems”, “Lifestyles and Social Welfare” and “Regional and Areal Studies” to guide the student through an empirical and systematic learning experience in order to obtain the vast knowledge and theories that have been accumulated in various domains of sociology. It is compulsory for each student to complete either “Research Practicum A” or “Readings and Research in Sociology A” (elective compulsory). “Seminar A” and “B” are both compulsory for all the students. Courses are arranged through the school years to allow a progressive and systematic learning experience with inter-course relationships and sequences taken into consideration.
      • To acquire scientific and empirical research techniques to explore social behaviors and systems, social research practice courses (“Research Practicum A” and “B”) are given in small groups (approximately ten people per group). At the end of “Research Practicum A” and “B”, research results will be published as a report to encourage the students to learn how to effectively communicate his or her thought in a written form.
      • A number of social research related courses including “Introduction to Sociological Inquiry”, “Research Design”, “Descriptive Statistics”, “Statistical Inference”, “Multivariate Analysis”, “Qualitative Analysis” and “Research Practicum A” are provided to learn appropriate knowledge and skills required to conduct social researches in a responsible and proactive manner.
      • Practical courses centering on in-depth literature reading and discussions (“Readings and Research in Sociology A” and “B”) are provided in small groups (approximately ten people per group) to guide the students to deepen their understanding in sociological theories and methods and learn to communicate and discuss their accumulated knowledge orally or in a written form.
      • Lectures given by academic experts and practitioners who are familiar with one of the three annually selected themes are provided (“Special Lecture on Sociology A”, “B”, “C”, “D”, “E” and “F”) to heighten student’s interests in the diverse cultures and values existing in various societies.
      • “Seminar A” and “B” are given in small groups (approximately ten people per group to guide the students to learn to be able to contemplate and analyze practical issues in society by utilizing what they have learned in the specialized curriculum in a comprehensive manner. In the second half of the second year, all the students in the Department of Sociology are required to select what seminar (each given by a single instructor) to participate according to their personal interests and social issue awareness. Through the third year “Seminar A” and fourth year “Seminar B” (both compulsory), the student will receive instructions and guidance from the same instructor as they work on personal research themes in a proactive manner toward completing the graduation thesis.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 9 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum and 24 credits from elective courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has a healthy interest in the diversity of values and cultures in various societies and is capable of and willing to obtain a deeper, better understanding of others.
    • Earning of 4 credits from the compulsory “Principles of Sociology 1” and “2” and 28 credits from elective compulsory courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed an evidence that the student has acquired a general, systematic understanding of the fields of sociology and has an understanding that personal issues are interrelated with social organizations and systems.
    • Earning of 6 credits from the compulsory “Introduction to Sociological Inquiry”, “Research Design” and “Descriptive Statistics” and 4 credits from the selective compulsory “Research Practicum A” or “Readings and Research in Sociology A” in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has acquired various scientific and empirical study skills including those of social researches and is capable of communicating his or her thought orally or in a written form in an easy-to-understand manner.
    • Earning of 8 credits from compulsory “Seminar A” and “B” and 8 credits from “Graduation Thesis” will be deemed as an evidence that the student is ready and willing to contemplate and analyze practical issues in society.
    • Review and oral examination of “Graduation Thesis” will be the basis of assessment whether or not the student fulfills all the qualities and capacities that are specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Admission Policy: Acceptance and screening of prospective entrants

School of Human Sciences
The School of Human Sciences seeks entrants with the following knowledge, skills, capacities and attitudes to provide teaching in accordance with its graduation, degree-awarding and course planning and implementation rules:

Department of Psychology
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses and also has logical thinking capacities using the result of mathematical analysis conducted based on the basic knowledge of “Mathematics (2 and B)”.
  3. Is strongly motivated to learn about human mind and behaviors and the mental activities and psychological functions that cause them for a deeper understanding of humanity.
  4. Has a broad interest in physiology, psychiatry, humanities, natural science and social science that are closely related to the study of psychology.
  5. Is strongly motivated to learn the accumulated findings and theories in various areas of psychology and to learn about psychological research techniques as an empirical science in order to act as a valuable member of society after graduation.
Department of Sociology
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses.
  3. Has acquired, through the high school “Mathematics (1, A and B)” courses, a level of knowledge in probability and statistics as a foundation for scientific thinking.
  4. Has, through the geography and history courses given in high school (World History, Geography and Japanese History), acquired a level of knowledge required to understand the diversity and historical background of the rapidly globalizing modern society.
  5. Is motivated to learn sociology and apply its advanced knowledge to contribute to the society.
  6. Is capable of and wiling to complete a lecture, laboratory work or practical course that is required to obtain required knowledge to a full accomplishment.
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