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School of Network and Information

Introduction to the School of Network and Information

The School of Network and Information was founded in 2001 to open up a new field of study, for example by offering Japan’s first content-oriented program of study, with the goal of training creative graduates with interdisciplinary knowledge through comprehensive education, and research into processes such as the collection, processing, and dissemination of information in society. Faculty members with a diverse range of areas of specialization, including science and engineering, business administration, marketing, design, media, and psychology, are working together to break down the boundaries between the humanities and sciences, and to create the new field of information science.

The progress in information science and technology has been rapid, with technologies and ideas that did not exist when the School of Network and Information was created gaining widespread adoption through their use in devices such as mobile phones. The School strives to train graduates by giving them an accurate understanding of progress in network and information technologies, and preparing them to put their knowledge to work in contributing to human society.

The School’s program is designed to foster the development of the basic abilities that underpin those skills: (1) the ability to learn in a sustained manner, (2) the ability to understand the basic nature of phenomena, (3) the ability to work effectively with others, (4) the ability to observe phenomena, (5) the ability to plan and take action, and (6) the ability to express knowledge. The School strives to not only give students’ specialized skills, but also to cultivate general ability that will resonate with, and find constructive use in, society.

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Department of Network and Information

Introduction to the Department of Network and Information

Covering information science in the broad sense as a discipline that encompasses both the humanities and sciences

eight programs Contemporary society demands workers who can put information technology to work in a variety of settings to solve problems. The Department of Network and Information trains information professionals who can harness advanced technical skills in the real world by offering a curriculum and practical educational program that allow students to study content based on a wide range of interests.

The Department offers eight programs targeting more narrowly defined areas of study to make course content easier for students to understand. In this way, it covers information science in the broad sense as a discipline that encompasses both the humanities and sciences.

At the heart of the School of Network and Information’s program lies “the project,” a required course that is offered to students during their third year of study. Just as with projects carried out by companies and other organizations, students with a common awareness of a given issue form a group and spend one year managing their project and accumulating research findings. Through educational and research programs such as this, the School seeks to train creative graduates with interdisciplinary knowledge.

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Diploma Policy: Awarding of degrees and certification of graduation

The mission of the School of Network and Information is to, through providing a comprehensive package of education and study opportunities related to the collection, processing and outputting of various information connected to the human society, to cultivate human resources with creative and academic skills and knowledge. The School awards a Bachelor’s Degree in Information Science to a student who has achieved the following qualities and capacities;
  1. Is capable of understanding and explaining, from a high-level point of view, what is “information” in the sense of information science, what is the principle and mechanism of handling such information and how such information can be applied to human beings and their society. (Knowledge and understanding)
  2. Has acquired a logical, mathematical and creative thinking capacity, quantification and information communication skills as well as information ethics, all of which can be applied to the use and handling of information. (Skills and power of expression)
  3. Is capable, by utilizing the skills and knowledge through learning at the Department, of finding and analyzing various issues in society to design and explain a solution for such issues in a convincing manner. (Power of thinking, judgment, skills and power of expression)
  4. Is capable, in the process of studying and solving an issue, of working as part of a team and effectively interacting with his or her teammates. (Interest, willingness, attitude, skills and power of expression)
  5. Is capable, in the process of finding and solving an issue in society, of contemplating its relationship with nature and human beings, human health and society, diverse human cultures and values, newly emerging information technologies and their related academic disciplines, for a proactive learning and acquisition of useful knowledge and skills. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)

Curriculum Policy: Planning and implementation of courses and programs

The School of Network and Information, in order for its students to attain the qualities and capabilities that they are expected to fulfill as the requirement to graduate and/or receive degrees, systematically and effectively plans courses in the transitional, introductory, liberal arts and specialized curricula to be provided by its departments, in an optimum mix of classroom lectures and practical courses. The planning and implementation of educational courses and programs and the evaluation of students’ learning achievements will be done in the following manner:
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including career and education related courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided in the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • As part of the specialized curriculum, basic information science courses are provided in the first year while more developed information courses are provided in the second and subsequent years. Practical courses are provided in all the years.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • The compulsory “Senshu University Introductory Seminar” is designed to cultivate in students a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills. The compulsory “Basics of Natural Sciences” courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues. The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. The compulsory “Sports Literacy” courses help through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner. The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society. Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help students deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world through appropriate language-based communications and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner. On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society. For a broader learning of humanities and sciences, taking of 8 credits from basic humanities and basic social science courses is recommended, while 4 credits from natural science courses are elective compulsory and “Sports and Wellness”, one of the health and physical education courses, is compulsory for all. (Courses and teaching contents)
    • For greater English language communication skills, students need to take 2 credits from “English B”, one of the basic foreign language courses, in the first year, and 2 credits from “English D”, one of the more advanced English courses, in the second year as is elective compulsory courses. Students are required to take an English placement test upon enrollment to be divided into multiple graded groups according to the test results so that each student will be given the most effective learning opportunities for his or her current status. Elective foreign language courses are provided for more advanced language learning opportunities. In addition, English for network and information courses are provided in the specialized curriculum for language skills specifically linked to information science. (Courses, teaching method and contents)
    • Ten compulsory courses are provided in the first year in the specialized curriculum for the learning of basic information science knowledge and skills, while more academically-oriented learning opportunities are also provided through linkage to general courses in the transitional and introductory curricula. Specific achievement requirements must be cleared before the students are allowed to proceed to the second year curriculum with more advanced learning opportunities. (Courses and teaching contents)
    • The specialized curriculum in the second and subsequent years provides opportunities to acquire more advanced knowledge, skills and problem-solving capacities in the field of information science. Students are given an option of selecting one of 8 “programs” linked to specific career tracks, that are “Contents Design”, “Media Produce”, “Network Systems”, “Physical Computing”, “Management Information”, “IT and Business”, “Social Informatics” and “Information Science”. They can take another “sub-program” (English for Network and Information). The learning and instruction targets and the curriculum tree are provided according to the program/sub-program combination to support systematic course selection. Acquisition of credits from “program”-designated compulsory and elective compulsory courses will be certified by issuing a “Program Certificate” at the time of graduation. (Courses and teaching contents)
    • Compulsory practical courses (“Academic Literacy Seminar”, “Introduction to Information Design”, “Programming Laboratory 1” and “Introduction to Data Analysis”) and elective compulsory practical courses (three laboratory work courses of “Interaction Design”, “Software Development” and “Data Analysis” plus a set of 8 “Advanced Laboratory” courses associated with each of the 8 selectable programs) are designed to assist the student to learn general information science knowledge and skills and to develop problem-solving capabilities using such knowledge and skills in a progressive manner. In the courses, students go through all or part of the problem solving cycle including problem analysis, designing and completing a solution and explaining and presenting the solution, either by themselves or working in a team. Small-group courses are given to experience team teaching including the instructor, teaching assistants and supporting staff members. (Courses, teaching method and contents)
    • Compulsory practical courses provided in the third year (“Projects”) are given by organizing the students into teams of approximately ten people to go through PBL. Over a period of approximately ten months, each team works as one to develop capabilities to detect and analyze problems and design and explain solutions with active communications among team members, working during and outside the course hours as required. Through this “Project” work, they learn to utilize their acquired knowledge and skills in a comprehensive manner and to pursue new knowledge and skills where necessary. Only a student who has earned at least one credit from a “Laboratory Work” or “Advanced Laboratory” course is allowed to take this “Project” course. For students who wish to acquire even more advanced special knowledge and skills and thinking and presentation capabilities, elective “Senior Seminar” (fourth year) and “Special Seminar” (second to fourth years) courses are provided. (Courses, teaching method and contents)
    • Elective-compulsory specialized courses, that are “Mathematical Literacy”, “Linear Algebra” and “Calculus” are provided, from which two or more credits must be earned, for the purpose of assisting students to acquire logical and mathematical thinking abilities and quantitative skills that are required to understand information science. Students are supervised to select the most appropriate set of courses according to their individual mathematical proficiency levels acquired through high school education. (Courses, teaching method and contents)
    • First-year compulsory “Information and Society” and third-year compulsory “Career Design” have the students experience lectures and dialogs with graduates and other working individuals to encourage the students to contemplate what they have learned in the university as well as what their prospective career tracks should be. Second- and third-year elective “Business Internship” has the students experience vocational internship at business organizations. (Courses, teaching method and contents)
    • The number of course credits that each student can pursue is appropriately limited so that they can have sufficient self-study time outside the course hours. Each course presents problems and challenges to be worked on by students in a self-motivated and proactive manner. A superior environment to support the students’ extra-curriculum study is provided, including the School’s dedicated computer room, a work space for team and individual activities, online study support facilities and provision of personal laptop computers for home study. (Courses, teaching method and contents)
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • In courses in the specialized curriculum, students’ learning achievements are evaluated through assessing and scoring a wide variety of aspects including written examinations, quality of reports and project submissions and the way they worked for making them, how they exchanged opinions and engaged in group discussions during the course hours, and the quality of presentations that they gave within and outside the course. Instructors give the students various forms of feedback on their performance so that the students will be informed of the level of achievements they are making through the courses in a clearest manner possible. (Evaluation of students’ learning method and achievements)
    • Evaluation of the degree of understanding of information science knowledge The basic understanding level will be evaluated based on whether or not the student has successfully completed all the compulsory specialized courses in the first year. Advanced knowledge acquisition will be evaluated based on whether or not the student has earned or exceeded the number of required graduation credits in other specialized courses. (Evaluation of students’ learning achievements)
    • Evaluation of necessary information handling skills The degree of information handling skills will be evaluated on the basis of whether or not the student has satisfied all the skill acquisition requirements in the compulsory and elective compulsory practical courses in the first to third years. (Evaluation of students’ learning achievements)
    • Evaluation of capacities for finding and analyzing a problem and designing, presenting and explaining a solution Problem solving capacities are evaluated on the basis of how they performed in solving realistic problems (for which multiple solutions can be applied) over a period of time in the second-year elective compulsory “Advanced Laboratory” courses as well as the third-year compulsory “Project” courses. Multiple instruction staff members are involved in a single “Advanced Laboratory” course for multidimensional performance evaluation. (Evaluation of students’ learning achievements)
    • Evaluation of whether or not and at what level the student is capable of working as a team and actively communicating with others toward solving a problem Problem solving capacities are evaluated on the basis of how they performed over a period of time in the third-year compulsory “Project” courses. (Evaluation of students’ learning achievements)
    • Evaluation of contemplation and self-learning capabilities in finding and solving a problem Evaluation will be given based on whether or not the student has earned or exceeded the number of required graduation credits from courses in the introductory and the liberal arts curricula as well as from the specialized curriculum. (Evaluation of students’ learning achievements)

Admission Policy: Acceptance and screening of prospective entrants

The School of Network and Information seeks entrants with the following knowledge, skills, capacities and attitudes to provide teaching in accordance with its graduation, degree-awarding and course planning and implementation rules:
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school or other pre-university curriculum in general.
  2. Has developed a strong interest in information science through high school textbooks or other pre-university learning and information sources and is motivated to work on social issues by utilizing his or her information science skills.
  3. Has basic arithmetic/mathematical knowledge and skills that are essential for logical and mathematical thinking and quantification skills.
  4. Has the Japanese language skills necessary for understanding and expressing the thinking and judgment of him or herself as well as of others.
  5. Is willing to proactively participate in group learning activities with others holding different values and thoughts than those of him or herself.
  6. Is motivated for a proactive personal growth based on variously acquired experiences and capacities.
  7. Even in cases of a certain degree of insufficiency in knowledge and skills that would be normally required through university life, is ready and willing to prepare him or herself in the remaining period up to the enrollment.

The following screening methods will be used to select the most appropriate entrants.
  • In the case of general examination applicant, 1 and 4 will be evaluated through written examination.
  • In the case of an applicant with school reference and recommendation, 1 to 7 will be evaluated through school reports, Reason for Application and theme-based writing composition test.
In the case of an AO entrance applicant, 1 to 7 will be evaluated, with a stronger emphasis on 2, 4, 6 and 7, through school reports, Reason for Application, Self Promotion, writing composition test and in-person interview.
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