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School of Letters

Introduction to the School of Letters

The School of Letters is dedicated to training promising graduates who possess a flexible imagination that resists undue influence by authority and rich personal traits by helping them master advanced, systematic specialized knowledge related to human nature while obtaining a far-ranging liberal arts education through research in various fields so that they can deal with the rapid globalization and computerization of our society.

Founded in 1966, the School was reorganized into seven distinct departments with clear areas of specialization in 2010. All seven departments share a philosophy that emphasizes encounters with authentic sources to facilitate the development of one’s thinking posture. By emphasizing the classics and the verification of knowledge through one’s own five senses as a way to zero in on the truth through research in various fields, the School enables students to engage in a deep study of specialized fields, while simultaneously developing the ability to flexibly deal with the real world.

The School emphasizes experiment and investigation, and practices an educational approach that encourages students to experience scholarship with immediacy and relevance. Its programs allow students to take specialized courses during their first two years of study, and the curriculum features an expansive range of semester courses, together with new courses designed to meet the changing needs of the times. Small-group seminars, to which all students are assigned, provide a particularly valuable opportunity to receive fine-grained advice and guidance from faculty members.

Introduction to the School of Letters

Department of Japanese Language

Introduction to the Department of Japanese Language

The Department of Japanese Language is dedicated to endowing students with the following abilities: to express themselves effectively in Japanese, and to communicate in a way that allows them to deepen their understanding of others; to understand the Japanese language and Japanese culture, including their rich historical character; to contribute to international society through outstanding knowledge and creativity; and to think and act from a global perspective.

The Department’s program is geared toward equipping students to assess the various characteristics and properties of the Japanese language from an academic and theoretical perspective, cultivating a well-balanced ability to use Japanese, and improving students’ ability to communicate in Japanese.

Its goal is to produce graduates who exhibit a deep understanding and awareness of Japanese, along with the knowledge and skills they will need to pursue careers in today’s computerized society. These assets, combined with extensive knowledge related to the study of the Japanese language, will enable them to contribute effectively to international society.

During their first year, students learn how to conduct language research while mastering the fundamentals needed to study Japanese. Then starting in their second year, they approach the study of Japanese from a variety of perspectives, for example via the history of the language, research into contemporary language, and research into historical materials. The Department’s approach is based on the belief that better communication becomes possible when students first understand Japanese, and then learn how to use the language most effectively.

The teaching of Japanese is also a priority for the Department, which seeks to train graduates so that they can pursue careers in international society. Even as students deepen their understanding and awareness of Japanese, the mechanisms by which foreigners learn language becomes clear, and together with associated issues contributes to the development of more effective learning materials.

Department of Japanese Literature and Culture

Introduction to the Department of Japanese Literature and Culture

The Department of Japanese Literature and Culture is dedicated to training richly creative graduates by imparting a broad and deep understanding of Japanese literature and culture throughout Japan’s long history, together with the ability to think flexibly and communicate effectively so that they can contribute to contemporary society.

The Department’s curriculum offers students a significant amount of freedom and takes as subjects of research the full breadth of expressive culture, including literature, traditional culture, film, drama, manga, and animation. Joint classes with overseas institutions conducted via network links provide opportunities for students to seek the views of students in Italy, Germany, and South Korea concerning topics such as Japanese authors and Noh and kabuki drama, and to investigate how Japanese culture is viewed overseas. The Department also offers a number of unique, practical courses on subjects such as creative writing by active writers, and editing by faculty members with working experience in the publishing industry. One major characteristic of its approach is that students go beyond simply interpreting works to learn about their creation (how they are produced) and media (how they reach their audience).

The Department offers a rich variety of courses that invite students to explore literature and culture from various eras and genres, from the Kojiki to Haruki Murakami and Hayao Miyazaki, and to interpret their appeal and significance. In doing so, they think about how works of literature can be read and interpreted, and how the diverse array of Japanese culture can be understood.

Media is essential in linking the author or producer of a work with their reader or audience. Taking a work of literature as an example, the editing and publication of the book serve that role. Students are able to study the actual editing process based on the experience of faculty members who have many years of experience working as editors.

Students can also experience the pleasure of creating their own work through courses on creating literature taught by novelists, and the practice of calligraphy taught by calligraphers. In this way, they can learn how the literature and culture with which we are so intimately familiar are created and produced.

Department of English

Introduction to the Department of English

The Department of English is dedicated to training richly creative graduates who bring to bear an exceptional level of international understanding made possible by solid English proficiency, and broad knowledge of the culture of English-speaking nations in today’s increasingly global society.

To achieve true proficiency in English, it is necessary to understand topics such as the literature and culture of English-speaking countries, as well as linguistics and English instruction. The Department of English has a faculty with areas of expertise that encompass a broad range of disciplines in English research, enabling them to foster the development of the deeply specialized knowledge that serves as the basis for English proficiency, as well as multicultural understanding. Its curriculum, which is designed to cultivate basic ability in English starting during a student’s first year, incorporates a wide range of communication-oriented activities. The curriculum divides into separate programs of study in a students’ second year, and is structured so that students can develop specialized knowledge from an early stage in their studies.

In addition, the Department offers fine-grained instruction that is custom-tailored to individual students’ abilities and personalities. Nowhere is this more evident than specialized introductory seminars for first-year students, which feature a small class size of about 20 so that participants can practice the grammar, vocabulary, and speaking skills that together form the foundation of their growing English proficiency. To refine students’ ability to communicate information based on their own thinking, the curriculum provides ample opportunities for the practical study of how to read documents, write reports, and participate in group discussions starting during the students’ first year. Beginning in their second year, students’ studies diverge as the Department’s curriculum separates into two programs of study, an English Communication Program that is designed to teach students how to deploy English in a variety of communication scenarios; and an English Culture Program that is designed to teach students the structure and history of the English language, and the historical, social, and cultural background of English literature and the English language itself. The Department assigns students faculty advisors and offers a general English seminar that helps students improve their overall English level with guidance that is custom-tailored to their ability level. Starting in their third year, all students are assigned to a seminar in which they conduct research on a topic of interest as part of a small group of 15 or less.

Department of Philosophy

Introduction to the Department of Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy is dedicated to training students to think flexibly so that they can understand other people and cultures on their own terms instead of adopting absolute views based on their own beliefs and perspective, while endowing them with the ability to approach phenomena analytically and to think logically and with tenacity.

The Department’s curriculum is designed to make it easy for students to discover the area they wish to study by fostering a sense of surprise and wonder at the breadth and range of philosophy as a discipline. Students gradually and progressively build up their own beliefs and thought processes, and embrace the challenge of expressing themselves verbally and communicating their ideas to others in the context of small classes, primarily in the form of seminars. The Department’s goal is to foster students’ ability to think in an abstract and tenacious manner, with the recognition that this ability forms the foundation of human life. In this way, the program cultivates the ability to organize the complex matters of the world, and then to replace their abstract thoughts with specific examples from society and human experience.

In specialized introductory seminars, first-year students learn how to think—the foundation of philosophy—through training in how to study at the university level and participate in group discussions. Specialized seminars start in the students’ second year, when they begin to pursue the research that will culminate in their fourth-year thesis.

The Department offers courses in which students study topics such as art theory and traditional Japanese performing arts taught by full-time faculty members who specialize in the philosophy of art, as well as an extensive selection of courses that expose students to various subcultures of society, film, drama, and other art forms.

Department of History

Introduction to the Department of History

The Department of History is dedicated to training students to explore what it means to be human through the study of the history of Japan and other regions around the world, to approach the essence of the events that characterize contemporary society through that exploration, to think about where the world is headed (no easy task today), and to develop an outlook on the future of human society.

The ratio of faculty members to students in the Department places it among the top ranks of history departments at private universities in Japan, and its approach to instruction takes advantage of an environment characterized by small classes where professors know each of their students by name.

In the study of history, it is important to consider what kind of people took action, where they did so, and why they were motivated to do so (i.e., to explore the thought process that went into the action). Once students have developed an understanding of regional connections and the continuity of eras, they delve more deeply into the periods and themes that interest them.

Senshu University provides an environment in which students can search for historical materials and solve the questions they raise, thanks to facilities such as an archaeology laboratory with an extensive selection of artifacts and research reports, and rooms for examining historical documents with a range of dictionaries, reference works, and equipment. The Department of History lets students experience the presence of the people who actually lived history in a way that is not possible with photographs or text, through an array of experiences that bring them face to face with the past, including courses and research that use historical materials such as invaluable ancient texts and archaeological training that lets them participate in an actual excavation during a summer camp.

In specialized introductory seminars offered during their first year, students study the broad trends of world history while enjoying intellectual stimulation together with fellow students who have a variety of interests. They also prepare for the seminar electives that they will begin taking during their second year by learning techniques and approaches that will be essential in their study of various fields of specialization.

Starting during their second year, students choose a theme of interest—for example, Japanese archaeology, ancient history, medieval history, modern history, or contemporary history; East Asian archaeology, ancient history, or modern history; South Asian modern history; French medieval history; German modern history; or American contemporary history—and conduct a deliberate study of that theme through a range of seminar-based courses.

Department of Geography

Introduction to the Department of Geography

The Department of Geography is dedicated to fostering an accurate understanding of contemporary issues involving regions and the environment, together with the analytical and thinking skills that are necessary in order to find solutions to those issues, through a systematic study of geography that emphasizes both fieldwork and analysis of spatial information. In doing so, the program seeks to train specialists whose careers involve regional and environmental analysis, geographical researchers and teachers, and professionals who can communicate their geographical knowledge to a diverse audience in wider society.

Most issues involving the environment do not have a single cause, but rather are linked to multiple factors. In geography, specialists first research and develop an understanding of the status quo and then search for solutions by coordinating a diverse array of specialized knowledge. To enable students to master this method of solving problems, the Department has developed a curriculum that invites them to undertake a balanced study of both the natural and social environment by incorporating a variety of topics from a broad perspective, including the heat island phenomenon, deforestation, abnormal weather, natural disasters, urban overpopulation, rural depopulation, and destruction of cultural landscapes. The Department’s programs value fieldwork. It is important for students to go out into the field when solving a problem so that they can observe the situation for themselves, search for an understanding of the problem by listening to others, and think about how to resolve the problem themselves. The skills fostered by this approach provide an effective toolset for resolving the full range of social issues.

The fields of specialization of the Department’s full-time faculty members cover most of the broad range of research areas in geography, including topography, climate, vegetation, maps, rural communities, cities, historical geography, population, and geographical description. At the same time, the various practical courses included in the curriculum enable students to conduct an all-around study of the entire field of geography.

By progressively shrinking class sizes as students advance in the program, the Department offers a rich educational experience that aligns closely with individual students’ personalities and future wishes. Courses such as practical training that require fine-grained guidance through dialog with faculty members provide an especially good opportunity to experience the benefits of this approach.

Department of Liberal Arts and Journalism

Introduction to the Department of Liberal Arts and Journalism

The Department of Liberal Arts and Journalism is dedicated to fostering the ability to accurately understand the languages and cultures of different countries and regions, sift through masses of information to discern truth, and help create a society in which citizens can enjoy fulfilling, engaged, and healthy lives. It does so through deep and integrated research into various fields undertaken in the context of our increasing international and information-driven society, and in the context of a contemporary Japanese society that is experiencing rapid aging and a declining birthrate.

The Department is the first undergraduate faculty in Japan to incorporate the word “journalism” into its name. “Liberal arts” connotes a diverse and wide-ranging education, while “journalism” signifies the ability to engage in dialog with others in one’s own words.

First-year students take common introductory courses, basic courses, department-specific specialized courses, and general courses. By taking general courses that introduce the subject matter of each of the Department’s programs, students prepare to select of one of those programs in their second year.

Starting in their second year, students are assigned to one of the Department’s three programs. These programs invite them to create their own curriculum to suit their intended area of specialization, and enable them take lecture courses that suit their own interests.

Even as they deepen their specialized knowledge in the program to which they belong during their second, third, and fourth years, students retain a high degree of freedom to take courses from other programs. The Department focuses on offering a fine-grained education in the context of small classes, and seminars provide an especially effective venue for instruction that meets individual students’ needs.

All lectures are offered under a half-year semester system. The Department works to foster students’ development into global citizens through study abroad, and to improve their academic skills through short-term, intensive study programs. In addition, the Department offers archive-related courses that cut across program boundaries, for example in library science and museology.

Diploma Policy: Awarding of degrees and certification of graduation

School of Letters
The School of Letters of the Senshu University awards a Bachelor’s Degree in Arts to a student who has completed all the study courses required by the university with 124 credits earned (including those from compulsory courses) and has gained the following qualities and capacities.
  • Has gained, by pursuing the academic discipline he or she has chosen, a flexible power of thinking and creativity free from constraints imposed by any established authority and also has a broad range of general knowledge.
  • Is capable of making a worthwhile contribution to the inheritance of existing cultures as well as creation of a new one by utilizing his or her advanced and systematic knowledge concerning human life and activities.
Based on this general principle, a student needs to have attained the below-described qualities and capacities to graduate from the individual departments of the School.

Department of Japanese Language
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has gained a systematic knowledge in the fields of grammar, vocabulary, phonetics and notation of the Japanese language and has an understanding of the historic transition of the language from the ancient times to the present. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Has a willingness to make a worthwhile contribution, by utilizing his or her accumulated valuable knowledge, to educational fields such as Japanese language education for Japanese and foreign learners as well as various other language-oriented fields. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Has effective communication skills to help improve mutual understanding with others and also to look at and analyze various subjects from an objective point of view. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Is capable of and has a willingness to proactively select the necessary method to improve his or her commutation skills and to thereby explain facts and opinions to others in a clear and easy-to-understand manner. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of Japanese Literature and Culture
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has a broad range of general knowledge in Japanese literature and culture. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Has a heightened interest in Japanese literature and culture as well as in various related fields and is willing to continue his or her active study in those fields. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Has a power of creative expression. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Has a power of comprehensive thinking and judgment based on his or her global perspective. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of English
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has attained a strong command of the English language as well as broad knowledge of literature, culture and history of the English-speaking world. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Has a global perspective based on his or her broad cultural knowledge of the English-speaking world. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Is capable of employing his or her strong command of the English language to clearly and effectively express his or her thinking or points of view in the global community. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Is capable of understanding the validity of his or her study as well as its issues and shortcomings and thereby exchanging constructive criticisms with other students. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of Philosophy
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has acquired the knowledge and theories that have been accumulated in various fields of philosophical and ideological thinking. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Is capable of holding a flexible view in understanding different people and cultures without placing an absolute importance on him or herself. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Is capable of accurately understanding a written document and expressing his or her interpretation of it in a convincing manner. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Is capable of contemplating a subject in a logical and analytical manner. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of History
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has acquired an understanding of events and phenomena in the history of Japan and other parts of the world that have been caused by or have fallen upon humans. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Is capable of finding an analytical method that could have been used to solve various problems and issues that are found in or related to various historical events. (Skills and power of expression)
  4. Is capable of voluntarily setting a specific study theme related to various historical events of the world, to study such theme in depth and to express his or her study result in a convincing manner. (Power of thinking and judgment)
  5. Is capable of understanding the validity of his or her study as well as its issues and shortcomings and thereby exchanging constructive criticisms with other students. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of Geography
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has attained basic geographical knowledge and theories as well as a geographical way of thinking. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Is willing to voluntarily find and solve issues related to geographical regions and environments. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Has acquired skills and capabilities to research and analyze regional and environmental topics to create a report or give a presentation. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Is capable of a scientific thinking that is important for solving regional and environmental issues. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of Liberal Arts and Journalism
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has a strong interest and curiosity in social phenomena and is capable of extracting the valuable truth from chaotic mixture of information. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  3. Is capable of finding and studying an issue and communicating his or her thought or judgment to others in a clear and eloquent manner. (Skills and power of expression)
  4. Is capable of proactively studying various issues and challenges related to the modern society, understanding and analyzing what is wrong or what must be corrected in relation to such issues or challenges to find a valid solution. (Power of thinking and judgment

Curriculum Policy: Planning and implementation of courses and programs

School of Letters
The School of Letters, in order for its students to attain the qualities and capabilities that they are expected to fulfill as the requirement to graduate and/or receive degrees, systematically and effectively plans courses in the transitional, introductory, liberal arts and specialized curricula to be provided by its departments, in an optimum mix of classroom lectures and practical courses. The planning and implementation of educational courses and programs and the evaluation of students’ learning achievements will be done in the following manner:

Department of Japanese Language
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including introductory seminar, basic statistics, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • The specialized curriculum allows the students to acquire a systematic knowledge in the fields of grammar, vocabulary, phonetics and notation of the Japanese language and provides specialized courses so that they can have an understanding of the historic transition of the language from the ancient times to the present. Furthermore, specialized courses such as Corpus linguistics, social linguistics, and Japanese language education for Japanese and foreign learners, are provided.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • “Basic Statistics” train students to correctly interpret data for valid analysis and utilization.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • As a preparation for the upcoming specialized courses, introductory Japanese language study and introductory seminar courses (the introductory curriculum) as well as Japanese-based information processing courses are designated as compulsory courses to take in the first year.
      • The specialized curriculum provided in the second and subsequent years includes specialized courses that cover a wide variety of subjects related to Japanese studies.
      • Seminar courses provided in the second and subsequent years are provided in small interactive groups to maximize the learning and potential growth opportunities or each student. Significant emphasis is placed on helping the students acquire oral presentation and writing composition skills.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 8 credits from compulsory basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum and also 22 credits from five compulsory courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired communication capabilities that are useful for deepening mutual understanding with others as well as observatory and analytical capacities an objective point of view.
    • Earning of 46 credits from courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed an evidence that the student has acquired a general, systematic knowledge in Japanese studies as well a valid understanding of the historical transitions of the Japanese language.
    • Completing and earning credits from seminars (practical courses) in the transitional and the specialized curricula will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of and willing to make a worthwhile contribution, by utilizing his or her accumulated valuable knowledge, to educational fields such as Japanese language education for Japanese and foreign learners as well as various other language-oriented fields.
    • Earning of 8 credits from graduation thesis work will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of and willing to proactively select the necessary method to improve his or her commutation skills and to thereby explain facts and opinions to others in a clear and easy-to-understand manner to the fulfillment of all the qualities and capacities that are specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Department of Japanese Literature and Culture
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including basic statistics, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided in the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • The specialized curriculum provides courses in the study of Japanese literature from ancient times to the present, study of the Japanese culture closely related to such literary works and creative writing exercise courses.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • “Basic Statistics” train students to correctly interpret data for valid analysis and utilization.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • A number of basic and introductory specialized courses related to the Japanese literature and culture are provided in the first year as preparation for the specialized curriculum in Japanese studies starting from the second year.
      • The specialized curriculum provided in the second and subsequent years includes a wide variety of specialized courses related to Japanese literature and culture.
      • Seminar courses that are provided in small groups continuously from the second to fourth years will assist students to acquire in-depth knowledge and research skills in his or her chosen academic field to conduct self-motivated studies.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 56 credits from courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed an evidence that the student has acquired a general, systematic understanding of the Japanese literature and culture.
    • Completing and earning credits from seminars (practical courses) in the transitional and specialized curricula will be deemed as an evidence that the student has a heightened interest in Japanese literature and culture as well as its various related fields and is willing to continue his or her active study in those fields.
    • Earning of 8 credits from graduation thesis work will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired valid expressive skills as well as comprehensive thinking and judgment capabilities based on global perspectives, to the fulfillment of all the qualities and capacities that are specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Department of English
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including introductory seminar, basic statistics, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • As part of the specialized curriculum, students are given an option to choose either the “English Communication Program” or the “English Literature Program” in the second year according to their personal interests. Courses will thereafter be given according to their chosen program.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • A compulsory “Introductory Seminar” course is provided in the first year to assist the students to develop the basic four English language skills that are “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing”.
      • “Basic Statistics” train students to correctly interpret data for valid analysis and utilization.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • Compulsory “Introduction to English Studies 1” and “2” are provided in the first year as introductory courses to advance to specialized courses.
      • In the first year, 14 compulsory English language learning courses that individually focus on one of the four basic English language skills (“listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing”) are provided in proficiency-based separate groups so that each student will be given the most effective language learning opportunities for his or her current status. In the second, third and fourth years, a total of 14 to 16 advanced English language skill improvement courses are taken as elective compulsory courses to aim at more advanced language skills.
      • Also in the second, third and fourth years, a wide variety of 77 to 81 specialized courses related to literature and cultures in the English-speaking world are provided as elective compulsory courses.
      • In the third and fourth years, seminar courses given in small groups are provided as compulsory courses to encourage each student to develop his or her unique personal potentials.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 4 credits from the compulsory basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum as well as earning credits from program-based compulsory courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired a high level of English proficiency as well as a valid knowledge of literature, cultures and history of the English-speaking world.
    • Completing and earning credits from the elective compulsory courses and elective courses specified in each program in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired a broad knowledge and understanding of literature, cultures and history of the English-speaking world as well as a valid level of English language proficiency that will be useful in the global community.
    • Completing and earning credits from seminars (practical courses) in the transitional and specialized curricula will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired a valid level of English language proficiency that will be useful in the global community with a capacity to clearly expressing his or her thoughts and judgments in English.
    • Earning 4 credits from “Thesis x” will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of understanding the validity of his or her study as well as its issues and shortcomings and thereby exchanging constructive criticisms with other students to the fulfillment of all the qualities and capacities specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Department of Philosophy
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including introductory seminar, basic statistics, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • As part of the specialized curriculum, introductory courses including general philosophical studies, ethics, logics and arts and science, courses related to philosophical and ideological histories from various geographical regions and periods in time, artistic and cultural courses, ancient language seminars and contemporary special lecture courses will be given in a progressive manner through the school years.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • “Basic Statistics” train students to correctly interpret data for valid analysis and utilization.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      Academic instructions through specialized courses as well as seminar and other practical courses will be provided to assist students to develop capacities to evaluate and contemplate a topic in analytical and logical manner and to positively understand other individuals and cultures.
      • An “Introductory Seminar” course is provided in the first year (as part of the introductory curriculum) in order for the students to familiarize themselves with the university curriculum system to facilitate for a well-balanced learning from liberal arts and specialized courses as well as academic introduction courses to learn the basics of the study of philosophy. In addition, a compulsory “Introduction to Philosophical Thinking” is designed to encourage students to widen their scope of interests while minimizing inconsistency between their personal interests and academic major selection.
      • To promote a capacity for better understanding of other individuals and cultures, a variety of academic introduction courses, 8 in the first year and 20 more in the second year, are provided.
      • Introductory courses to Greek and Latin languages, which are ancient languages indispensable for deeper learning in philosophical studies, are provided in the first year. Literature learning courses in these languages are also provided in the second year.
      • Advanced seminars are provided in the second and subsequent years as practical exercises to develop capacities to contemplate a subject in a logical and analytical manner.
      • Students in the fourth year are required to take graduation thesis work as a means to attain accurate reading comprehension of literary works and to correctly express his or her points of view.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 8 credits from compulsory basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum and also 24 credits from compulsory and elective compulsory courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of holding a flexible point of view in understanding other individuals and cultures without placing an absolute importance on him or herself.
    • Earning of 28 credits from courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed an evidence that the student has acquired a general, systematic understanding of the fields of philosophy and ideologies.
    • Completing and earning credits from seminars (practical courses) in the transitional and specialized curricula will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired a capacity to express his or her own interpretation in a convincing manner based on accurate reading comprehension skills.
    • Earning of 8 credits from graduation thesis work will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired capacities to contemplate a subject in a logical and analytical manner to the fulfillment of all the qualities and capacities that are specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Department of History
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including introductory seminar, basic statistics, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • As part of the specialized curriculum, a variety of specialized lecture courses and practical courses are provided so that the students will be given an opportunity to freely select advanced courses related to the Japanese, Asian and European histories as well as archaeological studies for an in-depth learning.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • A compulsory “Introductory Seminar” is provided to enable students to understand the significance of the study of history as an academic discipline and to learn its basic research and learning methodologies.
      • “Basic Statistics” train students to correctly interpret data for valid analysis and utilization.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • Introductory courses to various historical studies are provided in the first year.
      • A total of 20 “Interpretation of Historical Sources x” focusing on various languages and materials are provided in the second year to enable students for reading comprehension of historical materials that is essential for in-depth historical researches.
      • A wide variety of specialized courses are provided in the second and third years.
      • “Topics in World History x” enables students to have a picture of up-to-date historical trends in Japan and in other parts of the world.
      • “Seminar 1” and “2” are in small groups to best encourage each student to develop his or her unique personal potentials.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 12 credits from elective compulsory courses and 42 credits from elective courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired a valid understanding of various historical events and also analytical skills that could be used to solve the issues related to such historical events.
    • Completing and earning credits from seminars (practical courses) in the transitional and specialized curricula will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of voluntarily setting a specific study theme related to various historical events of the world, to study such theme in depth and to express his or her study result in a convincing manner.
    • Earning 8 credits from graduation thesis work will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of understanding the validity of his or her study as well as its issues and shortcomings and thereby exchanging constructive criticisms with other students to the fulfillment of all the qualities and capacities specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Department of Geography
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including introductory seminar, basic statistics, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • The specialized curriculum with an emphasis on both field works and spatial information analysis is provided in a progressive manner so that students can smoothly progress from geographical basics toward more specialized and applicational learnings through the school years.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • A compulsory “Introductory Seminar” is provided to enable students to acquire basic geographical knowledge and skills that would be required for specialized courses in the second and subsequent years.
      • “Basic Statistics” train students to correctly interpret data for valid analysis and utilization.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • Introductory courses to academic fields that comprise the environmental geography discipline are provided in the first and second years.
      • More advanced lecture courses and lecture/practical courses for learning field work techniques, spatial and statistical analysis, mapping, surveying and other geographical research skills are provided in the second and subsequent years. Of those skill-learning courses, more basic ones are provided in the second and third years while specialized or applicational ones are provided in the second, third and fourth years.
      • Small-group seminar courses that are provided in the third and fourth years best encourage each student’s personal potentials and extend his or her scope of interests.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 24 credits from elective compulsory courses in the specialized curriculum will be deemed an evidence that the student has acquired a general, systematic understanding of the study of geography including its basic theories and geographically-oriented way of thinking.
    • Earning of 16 credits from the compulsory “Introduction to Geography and Environment”, “Geographical Research and Field Work 1” and “Seminar 1” and “2” in the specialized courses will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of and willing to actively find and solve issues related to geographical regions or environment.
    • Earning of 8 credits from the elective compulsory “Research Methods in Human Geography 1” to “5”, “Research Methods in Physical Geography 1” to “3” and “Geographical Research and Field Work 2” in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired regional or environmental research and analysis skills to create reports or give presentations.
    • Earning of 8 credits from graduation thesis work will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired scientific thinking capacities that would be required for solving issues related to geographical regions or environment, to the fulfillment of all the qualities and capacities that are specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Department of Liberal Arts and Journalism
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including basic statistics, career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided in the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • As part of the specialized curriculum, students are given an option to choose one of the three programs of “Intercultural Studies”, “Lifelong Leaning” and “Journalism” for their second and subsequent years, where courses will be given according to their chosen program. In addition to the courses specific to each program, however, a series of inter-program “Archival Studies” courses are provided.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • “Basic Statistics” train students to correctly interpret data for valid analysis and utilization.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help the students, through appropriate language-based communications, to deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • Introductory courses to study subjects associated with all of the three programs are provided in the first year to develop the basic knowledge required for each of the program.
      • As part of the specialized curriculum in the second and subsequent years, a variety of up-to-date specialized courses associated with the selected “Intercultural Studies”, “Lifelong Studies” or “Journalism” program will be provided.
      • Each program is designed for the students to learn essential subjects for their respective proposed career tracks. However, students are also allowed to take specialized courses in other programs so that they can acquire a broader knowledge and higher problem-solving awareness.
      • Advanced seminars are provided in small groups in the second and subsequent years to best encourage each student to develop his or her unique personal potentials.
      • Practical on-hand learning opportunities are offered through overseas language learning programs and business internships.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 8 credits from basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired the basic language communication skills that are necessary to work or operate on an international scale.
    • Earning of 36 credits from elective compulsory courses in the specialized curriculum as well as 16 credits from elective courses will be deemed as an evidence that the student has the capacity and willingness to collect and analyze various forms of facts and information related to social and international issues, detecting any issue contained therein and logically expressing and debating how the issue can be solved. Furthermore, he or she will be assessed to have the capacity and willingness to form, on the principles of fairness, diversity and sustainability, his or her own idea about what the socio-economic system should be like and express such idea to others in a confident manner.
    • Completing and earning credits from seminars (practical courses) in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of voluntarily setting a specific study theme related to various historical events of the world, to study such theme in depth and to express his or her study result in a convincing manner.
    • Earning 8 credits from graduation thesis work will be deemed as an evidence that the student is capable of understanding the validity of his or her study as well as its issues and shortcomings and thereby exchanging constructive criticisms with other students to the fulfillment of all the qualities and capacities specified as graduation and degree-awarding requirements.

Admission Policy: Acceptance and screening of prospective entrants

School of Letters
The School of Letters seeks entrants with the following knowledge, skills, capacities and attitudes to provide teaching in accordance with its graduation, degree-awarding and course planning and implementation rules:

Department of Japanese Language
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses and has capacities to contemplate a subject in a logical manner.
  3. Has a strong interest and curiosity in the Japanese language and is highly motivated to obtain, even through hard training, capacities to observe and analyzes a subject based on systematic knowledge and from an objective point of view.

Department of Japanese Literature and Culture
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills through high school learning and also has a level of reading comprehension, expression and logical thinking capacities.
  3. Has basic knowledge in Japanese literature and culture through high school learning.
  4. Has a strong interest in Japanese literature and culture and is motivated and willing to evaluate a subject from a broad perspective.

Department of English
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses and has capacities to contemplate a subject in a logical manner.
  3. Has a strong interest in communications using the English language and also has a high level of curiosity in American and English literature, culture and history as well as English language studies and applicational linguistics.
  4. Is capable of evaluating a day-to-day social event or global situation based on facts and information and expressing his or her view on the topic in a logical manner.

Department of Philosophy
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses and has capacities to contemplate a subject in a logical manner.
  3. Is strongly motivated to study philosophy, ethics or human culture in general and is accustomed in philosophical or cultural reading and other related informational materials.
  4. Is highly motivated to obtain, even through hard training, capacities to develop capacities to evaluate and contemplate a topic in analytical and logical manner and to positively understand other individuals and cultures.

Department of History
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses and has capacities to contemplate a subject in a logical manner.
  3. Is strongly motivated to learn from human history and is accustomed to reading history and historical literature.
  4. Has a strong interest in social trends in the past and the present and is highly motivated to, even through hard work, to collect, organize, understand and analyze information and documents related to such social trends in a logical and effective manner.

Department of Geography
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses and also has logical and scientific thinking capacities in the mathematics, geography, history, civil studies, science and other fields.
  3. Has a string interest in contemporary issues related to geographical regions or environment and is accustomed to reading literature and informational materials related to such fields and may have actually visited locations of his or her interest.
  4. Is strongly motivated in outdoor and other research activities in various geographical regions and is aiming to use his or her environmental geography learning to contribute to the society.

Department of Liberal Arts and Journalism
  1. Has accomplished a good learning of the high school curriculum in general.
  2. Has acquired basic communication skills of “listening”, “speaking”, “reading” and “writing” through the high school “Japanese” and “English” courses, has capacities to contemplate a subject in a logical manner and is motivated to extract the valuable truth by his or her own efforts.
  3. In the middle of the information society that is rapidly progressing on a global scale, has a strong interest in international and contemporary social trends and is willing to act positively to help building a healthier and more fulfilling society for all.
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