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School of Economics

Introduction to the School of Economic

The School of Economics is one of Senshu University’s flagship schools, a status that is demonstrated by the frequency with which one hears the University described as an economics school or used as a synonym for excellence in economics. This status is embedded in the University’s history, when at the time of its founding in 1880 it became the first such institution to teach economics in Japanese, and since that time has continued to recognize economics as a core part of its educational programs. It also reflects longstanding tradition in the University’s educational and research activities, areas in which the institution has consistently exhibited a readiness to address the important issues of its times in a serious and forthright manner.

The School of Economics seeks to foster the development of future workers and businessmen who will benefit from a specialized education that confers deep insight and a high level of critical ability in our dynamic 21st-century society, by offering systematic instruction on research findings from specialized scientific disciplines that examine economic, social, and historical phenomena.

School of Economics

Department of Economics

Introduction to the Department of Economics

The Department of Economics seeks to endow individuals with specialized knowledge that will enable them to pursue productive careers in contemporary economic society, which continues to become increasingly complex and diverse, by offering instruction in comprehensive, systematic knowledge of economics across the entire breadth of the field, which addresses economic theory, history, and policy.

Economic activity comprises the cycle of production, distribution, allocation, consumption, and disposal. Today, there is pressure for society to transition to a sustainable basis that will allow this cycle to continue. Tasked with creating a new society, economics requires both specialized knowledge and an understanding of people and society.

In the Department of Economics, students undertake a systematic study of history, theory, and policy—the key fields of economics—in order to develop an understanding of the organization and mechanisms of economic society. By participating in classroom discussions, particularly in seminars, they conduct a deep exploration of the essence of economics and the emotional motivations of key players in the economic world.

Features of the Department of Economics

(1) Emphasis on small seminars

In first-year introductory seminars, students gain the intellectual approach needed to study at the university level (by developing college skills). In second-year seminars, they conduct a more specialized study of topics of interest while cultivating the ability to express themselves and convince others effectively.

(2) Four courses to deepen specialization

The program emphasizes courses about the theoretical foundation of economics for first-year students to provide with them an overview of the field. Then during their second year, students choose from one of the following courses representing broad economic domains, while envisioning their future careers in order to undertake more specialized study: History and Development, Welfare and Environment, Enterprise and Information, and Markets and Government.

(3) A curriculum that confers a broad perspective and practical skills

In addition to the courses that form the core of the Department’s program, students can take select courses offered by the Department of International Economics, as well as a variety of courses in the related areas of law, public administration, bookkeeping, and accounting. They also enjoy an extensive selection of internships and courses designed to foster practical skills that are taught by leading figures in business and government.

Department of International Economics

Introduction to the Department of International Economics

The Department of International Economics seeks to endow individuals with a global perspective and specialized knowledge that will enable them to pursue productive careers on the global stage while giving them a deep understanding of the characteristics of economic society internationally and in Japan, through academic instruction from the diverse perspectives of international economics, international society, and different cultures.

To ensure students understand contemporary international society, the Department offers an extensive range of courses that invite them to study the diverse range of conditions in the world, including the nature of international cooperation, and the gap between advanced and developing nations. Unique offerings give students numerous opportunities to learn from field experience, including an overseas training program, courses on NGO theory, and study-abroad programs. Students can also study foreign languages, including English, German, French, Chinese, Spanish, and Korean, as specialized courses.

Features of the Department of International Economics

(1) Commitment to small class sizes

The Department of International Economics emphasizes small class sizes in its specialized seminars, specialized courses, and specialized education courses that students begin to take starting in their second year of study.

(2) Extensive range of seminars

Based on their own interests, students are able to choose from specialized seminars on a broad range of topics, including trade, direct investment, environmental issues, and issues raised by the development of emerging and developing nations.

(3) Broad range of specialized educational offerings with international relevance

Through basic courses, core courses, regional studies, comparative research, and research of issues, students study specialized knowledge with international relevance in a systematic, broad-ranging manner that incorporates multifaceted perspectives.

(4) Extensive foreign language options

Foreign-language education:
The Department offers foreign-language education in languages that include English, German, French, Chinese, Spanish, Russian, Korean, and Indonesian. Students are required to take two languages including English. Many take advantage of this extensive range of foreign-language options to participate in a study abroad program.

Specialized education using foreign languages:
The Department offers a broad range of specialized education using foreign languages, including specialized courses that explore topics such as English in economic current events, international communication, international affairs, and special topics in regional studies.

Department of Economics (Evening Division)

Introduction to the Department of Economics (Evening Division)

The Department of Economics (Evening Division) seeks to facilitate the development of individuals with specialized knowledge that will enable them to pursue productive careers in today’s economic society, which continues to become increasingly complex and diverse, through instruction in comprehensive, systematic knowledge of economics across the entire breadth of the field, which addresses economic theory, history, and policy. At the same time, it simultaneously offers a high level of support for continuing study by students such as employees and working adults.

The Department has adopted a curriculum that is designed to allow students to deepen their own interests across a broad range of fields including theory, history, policy, international relations, and environmental economics. Furthermore, the University’s part-time (evening) program is distinguished by students’ ability to take specialized courses offered by schools other than the School of Economics, providing an effective way to deepen their studies while exposing them to specialized areas of law and commerce. In this way, the program gives students an opportunity to resolve their questions about the full range of economic phenomena, from familiar everyday matters to phenomena covered by the media.

Diploma Policy: Awarding of degrees and certification of graduation

School of Economics
The School of Economics of the Senshu University awards a Bachelor’s Degree in Economics to a person who has completed all the study courses required by the university with 124 credits earned (including those from compulsory courses), thereby having systematically achieved a study result that is economically, socially relevant and also attained a high level of knowledge and learning with a deep insight and strong critical power. Based on this general principle, a student needs to have attained the below-described qualities and capacities to graduate from the individual departments of the School.

Department of Economics
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Is capable of looking at and understanding economic phenomena in a comprehensive manner from the three perspectives of economic theory, economic history and economic policy. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Is capable of learning from daily economic news as well as from theoretical or historical reports, views and opinions in the field of economics to add to his or her own learning base. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Is able to and has a willingness to collect and analyze various forms of facts and information related to economics, detecting any issue contained therein and logically expressing and debating how the issue can be solved. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Is able to and has a willingness to form, on the principles of efficiency, fairness, richness, diversity and sustainability, his or her own idea about what the socio-economic system should be like and express such idea to others in a confident manner. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of International Economics
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Has attained good academic knowledge of international economics, international community and different cultures. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Is capable of having a global point of view by understanding the characteristics of the socio-economic systems of various countries including that of Japan. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Has a level of foreign language skills that is necessary to actively work or operate on an international scale. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Is able to and has a willingness to form his or her own idea about what the socio-economic system should be like and express such idea to others in a confident manner. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Department of Economics (Evening Division)
  1. Has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future. (Knowledge, understanding, interest, willingness and attitude)
  2. Is capable of looking at and understanding economic phenomena in a comprehensive manner from the three perspectives of economic theory, economic history and economic policy. (Knowledge and understanding)
  3. Is capable of learning from daily economic news as well as from theoretical or historical reports, views and opinions in the field of economics to add to his or her own learning base. (Interest, willingness and attitude)
  4. Is able to and has a willingness to collect and analyze various forms of facts and information related to economics, detecting any issue contained therein and logically expressing and debating how the issue can be solved. (Skills and power of expression)
  5. Is able to and has a willingness to form, on the principles of efficiency, fairness, richness, diversity and sustainability, his or her own idea about what the socio-economic system should be like and express such idea to others in a confident manner. (Power of thinking and judgment)

Curriculum Policy: Planning and implementation of courses and programs

School of Economics
The School of Economics, in order for its students to attain the qualities and capabilities that they are expected to fulfill as the requirement to graduate and/or receive degrees, systematically and effectively plans courses in the transitional, introductory, liberal arts and specialized curricula to be provided by its departments (liberal arts and specialized courses in the evening division of the Department of Economics), in an optimum mix of classroom lectures and practical courses. The planning and implementation of educational courses and programs and the evaluation of students’ learning achievements will be done in the following manner:

Department of Economics, Day Division
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided in the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • The specialized curriculum of the Department of Economics includes basic theory courses to build the foundation for more advanced economics study and learning as well as department-wide specialized courses in the first and second years. For the second and subsequent years, students are offered an option from the four categories of “History and Development”, “Welfare and Environment”, “Enterprise and Information” and “Markets and Government”. Each category provides courses that will facilitate advanced learning and valuable academic study opportunities.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surround them as well as cutting edge science technologies and help them acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help students deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world through appropriate language-based communications and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      • Of the introductory courses provided in the first year, the compulsory four courses, that are “Introduction to Socio-Economy”, “Introduction to Socio-Economics”, “Introduction to Contemporary Economy” and “Introduction to Contemporary Economics”, assist students to acquire the most basic understanding of “what is economy?” and “what is economics as an academic discipline?”. The elective compulsory “Economic Thoughts”, “History and Economy” and “Basic Mathematics” help develop a fundamental recognition framework to be able to validly contemplate economic phenomena and to acquire learning skills to prepare for more advanced economics studies.
      • The basic courses provided in the second year, that are “Principles of Capitalism 1” and “2”, “Microeconomics 1” and “2” and “Macroeconomics 1” and “2”, assist students to understand the basic mechanisms of capitalism economy and the characteristics of modern capitalism and to have an idea of how the market mechanism operates based on the activities of economic entities including businesses and individuals, to be able to contemplate domestic and international economies in a comprehensive manner. There are a number of applicational study courses, including “Japanese Economy x” and “Public Finance x”, that all students are recommended to take regardless of his or her chosen categories. These courses are offered as common courses for the second and subsequent years. These basic and common courses help students to be capable of looking at and understanding economic phenomena in a comprehensive manner from the three perspectives of economic theory, economic history and economic policy.
      • Four program categories that can be selected for the second and subsequent years, that are “History and Development”, “Welfare and Environment”, “Enterprise and Information” and “Markets and Government”, assist students to acquire the skills to collect theoretical and historical knowledge related to economics, to analyze relevant facts and information and to discuss and exchange opinions toward finding and solving issues related to economy. Each of the four categories provides elective courses to attain a wider scope of economic knowledge and perspective by elective compulsory courses for in-depth evaluation of issues and solutions in that category as well as courses provided in other three categories or the Department of International Economics.
      • “Seminar x” and “Seminar Study Reports x” that are provided in small groups in the second, third and fourth years help students, by studying about advanced academic themes taught by the individual instructors through literature reading, field works, problem solving exercises and discussion and presentations, to be able to contemplate what the economic society should be really like and to express his or her own idea of it in a convincing manner.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Completing and earning 12 credits from introductory courses (8 from compulsory courses and 4 from elective compulsory courses), 8 from basic courses (selective compulsory courses) and 20 from common courses (selective compulsory courses) in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has acquire the capacity to understand economic phenomena in a comprehensive manner from the three perspectives of economic theory, economic history and economics policy.
    • Completing and earning 16 credits (elective compulsory courses) from “Senshu University Introductory Seminar” in the transitional curriculum, the extended “Seminar x” or “Seminar Study Reports x” in the specialized curriculum or program categories will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has acquired theoretical and historical knowledge related to economy and has added such knowledge to his or her learning foundation. The student will also be assessed to have the capacity and willingness to collect and analyze various forms of facts and information related to economics, detecting any issue contained therein and logically expressing and debating how the issue can be solved. Furthermore, he or she will be assessed to have the capacity and willingness to form, on the principles of efficiency, fairness, richness, diversity and sustainability, his or her own idea about what the socio-economic system should be like and express such idea to others in a confident manner.
    • Evaluation of students’ learning achievements will be done based on whether he or she satisfies the graduation requirements for the proposed degree specified by each Department according to the achievement evaluation criteria under the Departmental syllabus.

Department of International Economics, Day Division
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • Senshu University introductory courses are provided in the first year as the transitional curriculum.
    • Senshu University basic courses, including career and education related courses, information literacy courses, basic natural science courses, basic foreign language courses and sports literary courses, are also provided in the first year as the introductory curriculum.
    • Basic humanity and social science courses are provided in the first and second years as the liberal arts curriculum. In addition, interdisciplinary (“composite”) courses are provided in the second and subsequent years while natural science, foreign language and health physical education courses are provided in all the years.
    • The specialized curriculum of the Department of International Economics provides basic international economy courses in the first year. In the second and subsequent years, the Department provides “Area Studies x”, “Comparative Studies”, “Contemporary Issues”, “Regional Languages”, “Seminars”, “Open Economics Courses” and other related courses to assist students for advanced knowledge acquisition.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Transitional curriculum (Senshu University introductory courses)
      The transitional curriculum is designed to assist new entrants through the “transit” from high school education to a completely different world of university education, to cultivate in them a sense of pride and awareness as a Senshu student and initiate them into the process of developing a “socio-intelligence”. The course is implemented through a so-called “Senshu University Introductory Seminar”, a small-group tutorial program that prepares the students for the upcoming education through their years at the university with necessary reading, thinking, presentation and composition skills.
    • Introductory curriculum (Senshu University basic courses)
      The introductory curriculum is intended to help the students acquire basic learning skills, which will be important for attaining specialized knowledge and skills and the thinking ability based such knowledge and skills while also gaining a global perspective. These learning skills will not only be useful for learning at the university but will also be an essential tool for self-learning and improvement throughout the student’s life after graduation.
      • The career and education related courses help the students attain the capacity to build his or her own future through acting and thinking in a proactive manner.
      • The information literacy courses help the students acquire the skills to analyze and utilize information in a logical and scientific manner by using information technologies. The courses also nurture a sense of responsibility as a full-grown member of the society.
      • The basic natural science courses encourage students to be interested in natural phenomena that surrounding them and also cutting edge science technologies and help them to acquire a proactive thinking attitude to contemplate various issues.
      • The basic foreign language courses help students learn language grammars and build vocabulary in a fundamental and systematic manner, to deepen his or her understanding of cultures and societies of the world and to contemplate and deal with various issues in a flexible and comprehensive manner. English is compulsory for all. Students will be divided in multiple English learning groups according to their proficiency in the language so that each student will be given the most effective English learning opportunities for his or her present capacity. One more foreign language is compulsory. Courses are provided to build proficiency in the chosen language from the very basics.
      • Sports literacy courses help, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Liberal arts curriculum (liberal arts courses)
      The liberal arts curriculum is intended for the students to acquire a range of knowledge and skills that is much broader than their respective major field so that they will be able to approach topics and subjects from a versatile point of view.
      • Basic humanities, basic social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      • The interdisciplinary, or “composite”, study courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      • Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help students deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world through appropriate language-based communications and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      • On the basis of sports literacy in the introductory curriculum, health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized curriculum (specialized courses)
      In the specialized curriculum, basic and fundamental courses are given in the first and second years to develop basic academic knowledge of international economics and the international community containing various cultures. In the second and subsequent years, the following specialized courses are provided to help the students to acquire advanced academic knowledge and global perspective related to international economy and the international community containing various cultures as well as language communication skills that would be essential to work or act on a global basis.
      • Specialized courses through “Area Studies” courses assist students to understand the economic societies and various cultures of the world and to develop a global perspective.
      • Specialized courses through “Comparative Studies” courses assist students to understand the economic societies of Japan and various other parts of the world from a comparative manner to develop a global perspective.
      • Specialized courses through “Contemporaneity Issues” courses encourage students to understand various issues and challenges in the international community and to obtain more advanced knowledge of international economy and the international community containing various cultures.
      • Specialized courses through “Regional Languages” courses help students acquire a level of foreign language skills that is necessary to actively work or operate on an international scale.
      • “Seminar x”, “Seminar Study Reports x” and “Thesis x” that are provided in small groups in the second, third and fourth years help students, by exercising report writing in specialized courses, to be able to contemplate what the economic society should be really like and to express his or her own idea of it in a convincing manner.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 8 credits from courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 8 credits from basic foreign language courses in the introductory curriculum plus 4 credits from foreign language courses in the liberal arts curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired the basic language communication skills that are necessary to work or operate on an international scale.
    • In the specialized curriculum, earnings of 18 credits from basic courses (12 from compulsory courses and 6 from elective compulsory courses) and 8 credits from fundamental courses will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired basic academic knowledge about international economy and the international community containing various cultures.
    • In the specialized curriculum, earnings of 8 credits from Regional Studies courses, 4 credits from Comparative Studies courses and 4 credits from Contemporary Issues courses will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired more advanced academic knowledge of international economy and the international community containing various cultures and is capable of having a global perspective through his or her understanding of the characteristics of the economic societies of Japan and other parts of the world.
    • In the specialized curriculum, earning of 8 credits from Regional Languages courses (4 credits from compulsory courses and 4 credits from elective compulsory courses) will be deemed as an evidence that the student has acquired language communication skills that are necessary to work or operate on an international scale.
    • Completing and earning credits from “Senshu University Introductory Seminar” in the transitional curriculum as well as the extended “Seminar x”, “Seminar Study Reports x” or “Thesis x” in the specialized curriculum will be deemed as an evidence that he or she is capable of contemplating what the international society or international economy should be really like and expressing his or her idea of it in a convincing manner.
    • Evaluation of students’ learning achievements will be done based on whether he or she satisfies the graduation requirements for the proposed degree specified by each Department according to the achievement evaluation criteria under the Departmental syllabus

Department of Economics, Evening Division
  1. An overview of educational courses
    • The Department provides humanities, social science, natural science, general education, foreign language and health and physical education courses as its liberal arts courses.
    • As part of the specialized courses, the Department provides specialized economics courses, “combined-discipline” courses with the School of Law and School of Commerce as well as first-year education courses to assist students’ transfer from high school education and also to support working students.
  2. Teaching method and content
    • Liberal arts courses
      Humanities, social science and natural science courses are designed to help students, through learning topics, knowledge and terminology in the respective academic fields being taught, to be able to think about and solve various issues in society in a proactive manner.
      The general education courses encourage the students to realize that multiple-disciplinary approaches can be taken to study the same theme and help them acquire a flexible, multidimensional and comprehensive thinking attitude to work on and study various issues in society.
      Foreign language courses build on the foundation developed through the basic courses to acquire more advanced language utilization skills and to help students deepen understanding of various cultures and societies of the world through appropriate language-based communications and to work on and solve various issues in a comprehensive manner.
      Health and physical education courses help students, through encouraging communication skills through sports activities and providing opportunities to learn the value of physical exercise and athletism, nurture a capacity to cope with and solve various issues related to life and society.
    • Specialized courses
      Specialized courses include the basic theory courses to prepare for more advanced economics learning and specialized courses offered to all Economic Department students as well as the three course models of “General Economics Model”, “Applied Economics I Model” and “Applied Economics II Model”, based on which other extended courses are provided. Advanced academic learning through these courses will train students to understand economic phenomena in a comprehensive manner through the three perspectives of economic theory, economic history and economic policy. The courses will also assist students to acquire theoretical and historical knowledge related to economy.
      Offering of specialized courses and “combined-discipline” courses with the School of Law and School of Commerce as well as their organic link with a wider range of liberal arts courses will train students to analyze facts and information and to discuss and exchange opinions for finding and solving economy-related issues.
      “Seminar x” and “Seminar Study Reports x” that are provided in small groups in the second, third and fourth years help students, by studying about advanced academic themes taught by the individual instructors through literature reading, field works, problem solving exercises and discussion and presentations, to be able to contemplate what the economic society should be really like and to express his or her own idea of it in a convincing manner.
  3. Evaluation of students’ learning achievements
    • Earning of 24 credits from liberal arts courses will be deemed as an evidence that he or she has attained an extensive knowledge in culture, history, nature as well as in social and public affairs and is capable of having a versatile point of view in dealing with social and public issues that they may face in the future.
    • Earning of 8 credits from compulsory courses in specialized courses will be deemed as an evidence that he or she is capable of looking at and understanding economic phenomena in a comprehensive manner from the three perspectives of economic theory, economic history and economic policy. The student will also be assessed that he or she is capable of learning from daily economic news as well as from theoretical or historical reports, views and opinions in the field of economics to add to his or her own knowledge base.
    • Earning of 44 credits from elective compulsory courses in specialized courses will be deemed as an evidence that the student has the capacity and willingness to collect and analyze various forms of facts and information related to economics, detecting any issue contained therein and logically expressing and debating how the issue can be solved. Furthermore, he or she will be assessed to have the capacity and willingness to form, on the principles of efficiency, fairness, richness, diversity and sustainability, his or her own idea about what the socio-economic system should be like and express such idea to others in a confident manner.
    • Evaluation of students’ learning achievements will be done based on whether he or she satisfies the graduation requirements for the proposed degree specified by each Department according to the achievement evaluation criteria under the Departmental syllabus.

Admission Policy: Acceptance and screening of prospective entrants

School of Economics
The School of Economics seeks entrants with the following knowledge, skills, capacities and attitudes to provide teaching in accordance with its graduation, degree-awarding and course planning and implementation rules. The School may employ a number of screening methods to select such entrants in the most appropriate manner.

Department of Economics, Day Division
  1. Has a basic understanding and knowledge of all the subjects taught in the high school curriculum.
  2. Has basic Japanese language skills as a foundation for fulfilling report assignments, taking descriptive examinations or preparing research papers.
  3. Has the basic English language skills as the foundation for learning about the global economy.
  4. Has a level of knowledge in geography, history and civil studies, that comprise a basic social science learning provided in high school, and also has basic mathematical knowledge that would be required for quantitative understanding of social phenomena.
  5. Has a strong interest in day-to-day trends in economic and social situations that are communicated through mass media.

Department of International Economics, Day Division
  1. Has a basic understanding and knowledge of all the subjects taught in the high school curriculum.
  2. Has basic Japanese language skills as a foundation for fulfilling report assignments, taking descriptive examinations or preparing research papers.
  3. Has the basic English language skills as the foundation for learning about the global economy.
  4. Has a level of understanding in geography, history and civil studies that would be essential for learning about the global economy.
  5. Has a strong interest in day-to-day trends in economic and social situations that are communicated through mass media.

Department of Economics, Evening Division
  1. Has a basic understanding and knowledge of all the subjects taught in the high school curriculum.
  2. Has basic Japanese language skills as a foundation for fulfilling report assignments, taking descriptive examinations or preparing research papers.
  3. Has a level of knowledge in geography, history and civil studies that would be essential in learning economics and other social sciences as well as basic English language skills as a foundation for learning about the global economy and also basic mathematical knowledge that would be required for the quantitative understanding of social phenomena.
  4. Has a strong interest in day-to-day trends in economic and social situations that are communicated through mass media.
  5. In the case of adult or working applicants, is strongly motivated in learning about the economy to a specific goal, by utilizing his or her experience and knowledge accumulated through job engagement or other social activities.
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